‘Pinchillo de Navidad’ (Christmas Hash)

5 Jan
Here's what we started with,(and no there weren't 15 people coming, just 8!)...

Here’s what we started with,(and no there weren’t 15 people coming, just 8!)…

Well good evening everyone, and firstly a very Happy Christmas to you all. It’s the evening after Boxing Day here, and as such the novelty and general bonhomie of Christmas is starting to wear a little thin! If like the vast majority of people, you catered for an imaginary 150 guests on Tuesday, then you will have an ample supply of leftovers clogging up every work top, cupboard and shelf in the fridge. So here is just a quick idea on what you can do with them. Now, I’m not one for blowing my own trumpet, but I am sorely tempted next year, to cook the big dinner two days early, and serve this on the big day.

Those of you that know me, will be aware of the fact that ‘now and again’ I dip my toe into the Twittersphere, (yes, I know, there is a certain amount of poetic licence in that comment!). Whilst on there recently, I have happened across so many ‘top people’, and one or two of those have turned into what ‘El Maestro’ Keith Floyd would have referred to as his ‘newest top Twitterchums’. One such person is the wonderfully talented, ( and keeper of many an Eastern culinary treasure), @boobswithbrains, and it was she who was the inspiration behind this dish. Yesterday afternoon she posted some wonderful tweets describing the creation of that traditional favourite leftover dish ‘Bubble and Squeak’. When sometime later she sent a picture of the finished dish with the title ‘Yummy Caramalised Oniony Goodness’ then the gauntlet was thrown, and I set to work trying to come up with something to rival what was, I admit a masterpiece. Being a lover of all things Spanish, (and having Chorizo amongst my leftovers), I decided to try and put a Spanish twist on proceedings, and this is what I came up with.

As ever, preparation is the key. Roughly tear your leftovers into chunky pieces...

As ever, preparation is the key. Roughly tear your leftovers into chunky pieces…

If you look at my chopping board, you can see what I had to hand. Starting at 12 o’clock, I had the ubiquitous Brussels Sprouts, Gammon (with a chilli jam glaze), Roast Rib of Beef, a portion of Pan fried Chicken and Chorizo Picante (from the kids Christmas Eve tea), some roast potatoes, stuffing balls, and then the remains of my Shredded Sprouts with Pancetta and Cumin. Now much the same as everything I try and show you, the few minutes you spend preparing the bits and bats, (let’s face it your list is going to be different to mine!), the easier the cooking will be. So in the tradition of keeping things ‘rustic’ you need to tear all the ‘stuff’ up into nice chunky pieces of roughly the same size because the last thing you want is a plate of stodge. The only other things you’ll need are a good heavy frying pan, salt, black pepper, olive oil, and a bottle of Worcester Sauce.

Try not to break things up to much, keep it chunky...

Try not to break things up to much, keep it chunky…

First into the searing hot pan with a good slug of Olive Oil are the potatoes, they’ll brown quite quickly, so turn the heat down to medium now and let the residual heat work to brown off the rest of the ingredients as they first hit the pan. I’m going to be brutally honest here, I didnt do the fancy ‘Nigella’ or ‘Jamie’ spuds this year. I decided to keep it simple and did ‘Tescos Roast Potatoes in Goose Fat’ and they were bloody lush! I also bought 4 packs of the things, as I knew I’d be doing something like this at somepoint.

Fry the meat until it goes nice and crispy...

Fry the meat until it goes nice and crispy…

Next in, whatever meat you have, in my case Gammon, Beef, Chicken and Chorizo, and this is when I threw in my stuffing balls for good measure. Now you know how much I like to toss when I’m cooking, and here’s where your wrist action comes into play. Spend the next few minutes flicking your wrist and giving it the full ‘Ainsley Harriot’ (only without the God damn annoying voice!) until you see the meat crisping up and taking on some serious colour. Take your time here, get the meat nice and crispy before you move on, because the more things that go in the pan, the more they start to steam, rather than fry.

A good slug of Worcestershire Sauce for the pan, and a good glug of whatever for the chef...!

A good slug of Worcestershire Sauce for the pan, and a good glug of whatever for the chef…!

Once that’s done, it’s in with the veggies, they should hold their shape, (unless of course you cooked them to within an inch of their lives on the big day), and now a good glug of Worcestershire Sauce, to get some steam in the pan, and start the caramelisation process, and a couple of grinds of salt and pepper. You may find that the process slows a little now, and so this would be the perfect moment to pour a glass of Rioja, or as I did, crack open an ice-cold beer and just relax as the veggies and the meat combine their flavours in the pan.

Press everything down firmly, and gradually, as you turn things over, a wonderful crust will form...

Press everything down firmly, and gradually, as you turn things over, a wonderful crust will form…

All that remains now, is to press everything down in the pan, and then every couple of minutes or so, give it a slow gentle turnover in the pan, then press it down again. Keep doing this until the dish starts to dry out a little, and everything has a wonderfully caramalised look to it. This last stage allows any excess sauce to evaporate, and if you’re brave and attentive you can keep going here for a good five minutes to allow everything to crisp up which really adds to the final dish.

It's worth the wait! To be honest I enjoyed this more than the main event...!

It’s worth the wait! To be honest I enjoyed this more than the main event…!

Finally, tip everything out onto a warm plate, and top with a little grated cheese, (in my case Manchego to stick with the Spanish twist). Slide the plate under a fiercely hot grill to brown off the cheese for a minute or three, and then serve with whatever leftover beer you have available, (Stella 4 in this instance, but a large ice cold bottle of San Miguel would have been the piéce de resistance!).

So to find a name for the dish. I don’t propose to be a natural speaker of the lingo, so I enlisted the Interweb to help me out. I finally found that ‘Pinchillo’ translates as ‘hash’ and I knew that ‘Navidad’ was Christmas, and thus a dish was born! So thanks @boobswithbrains for starting the whole thing off !

As ever, if you are inspired to have a go at this, let me know how it went by leaving a comment below. If you’re shy, and don’t want to, well aside from ‘growing a pair!’, just click on the ‘like’ button underneath. You can share this with your friends using the ‘Twitter’ and ‘Facebook’ buttons, and of course anyone logged in via WordPress can ‘Press This’ (I’ll be honest, I don’t know what it does but I bet it’s nice). Anyway you chose, just keep in touch, us bloggers thrive on it!

I hope you’ve had a really great festive period, and look forward to pushing our culinary relationship to new boundaries next year… Laters peeps FD :@)

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2 Responses to “‘Pinchillo de Navidad’ (Christmas Hash)”

  1. Jan January 7, 2013 at 12:42 pm #

    Bigger pictures – Love it!

    • Floyd Kay (Snr) January 7, 2013 at 1:00 pm #

      Thanks for the feedback! Really glad you like it.
      FD :@)

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